google8d2f7fffcdc71abe.html

POSTCARDS FROM STANLAND

Across the vast steppe and mountain ranges, to fabled Silk Road cities, the Soviet rust belt and the futuristic architecture of Astana, Kazakhstan’s capital, my offbeat memoir takes you to a remote, diverse and strategically vital region--the former Soviet republics of Central Asia.  That jumble of countries whose names end in -stan: Stanland.   

You'll meet teachers, students, politicians, entrepreneurs, journalists, cab-drivers and market sellers to learn about their history, culture and struggle to survive in the post-Soviet era.  You'll enjoy the stories and landscapes, but be happy you skipped the dangerous flights and bad hotels.

Postcards from Stanlandpublished in March 2016 by the Ohio University Press. Available at Amazon, Barnes & Noble, Books-A-Million, other online retailers or Swallow Press

Reviews

 “The ideal author to demystify the region and its people.”  Library Journal.

 “A genial travel guide … an academic who doesn’t write like an academic." Kirkus Reviews. 

Meeting a Kazakh batyr, an 18th century warrior chief, at a resort in the Tien Shan Mountains near Almaty

Meeting a Kazakh batyr, an 18th century warrior chief, at a resort in the Tien Shan Mountains near Almaty

"Postcards from Stanland is strongest when it discusses the subtleties of national and ethnic identity, the lingering and often still strong political, cultural and personal relationship with Russia, and the way the past affects the present." The Asian Review of Books.

"With its rich depiction of life in Central Asia and authoritative yet accessible style, Postcards deserves a wide audience, from high school students to secretaries of state."  Eurasianet.

"Part memoir, part tour guide, part commentary, it is a casual, hybrid book ... Its stylistic flexibility is a strength, allowing Mould to provide snapshots of ordinary life and bite-sized accounts of unusual encounters. His excitement and thrill in discovering a land about which so little is known, where geographical, cultural and even religious worlds collide, is evident." New Eastern Europe.

Read and hear excerpts at Travel Blogs from Asia and Africa and on

Facebook: PostcardsFromStanland

 YouTube: http://bit.ly/davidhmould

What inspired me to write the book? See The Writing of Postcards from Stanland

David aged 8.jpg

Britain's imperial mission, and how I failed it. 

 

 

My memoir of the nine worst years of my life at a British boarding school, published in the literary journal Broad Street, November 18, 2017.

166832-LeninKarakol.png

Down with Stonewall Jackson! He's just like Lenin

Are there lessons from post-Soviet history for current controversies over Civil War statues and memorials?

History News Network, September 10, 2017.

Monsoon Postcards: INDIAN OCEAN JOURNEYS (2019)

My second book describes an arc around the Indian Ocean with insights into the history, geography, politics, economy, climate and belief systems of five countries where I’ve traveled and worked over the last decade.

Courtesy The Daily Star, Bangladesh

Courtesy The Daily Star, Bangladesh

My story begins in  Madagascar's capital, Antananarivo, which I describe as "Paris with rice paddies," then moves to the Central Highlands, the heartland of the Merina people who still practice famadihana, the ritual re-interment of their ancestors. I hang out with lemurs in the jungle and take a bumpy two-day overland trip across mountains, savanna grasslands and desert to the southwest. From Madagascar, I head across the Mozambique Channel and up the Zambezi River to Malawi, a country linked to the Indian Ocean by exploration, slavery and trade. Then across the Arabian Sea to the Indian sub-continent. India defies generalizations because of its social, ethnic and religious diversity. My narrative begins in the capital Delhi, then broadens out in space and time, exploring the colonial legacy, the partition of British India, and the country’s demographic, economic and environmental challenges. From the north, I move to the ancient kingdom of Hyderabad, and finally to the under-developed “chicken-neck,” India’s Appalachia, the northeastern states of Assam and Meghalaya. Then I follow the Brahmaputra River south to Bangladesh, a country defined by its bitter struggle for independence. From the chaotic traffic and garment factories of Dhaka, I travel to the rice bowl and commercial centers of western Bangladesh, to the tea gardens of the northeast and to the delta region—the front line for climate change. My journey ends in Indonesia—at Banda Aceh, ground zero for the 2004 tsunami, the noise and traffic of the capital, Jakarta, ancient Yogyakarta, and the beaches and back country of Bali.

From the Ohio University Press (2019). Read about my travels in Madagascar on Travel Blogs from Asia and Africa.

group-of-people-standing-near-baobab-trees-madagascar.jpg

Times Higher Education:

Social science research in Madagascar--It's a jungle

David Mould had to navigate cartoon lemurs and other barriers in order to help local academics study factors hindering development. Times Higher Education, June 30, 2016.

 
  TRAINING/CONSULTING I regularly conduct workshops for journalists, broadcasters, development professionals, university faculty and students in Asia and Africa.  My specialties are reporting on human development issues, including the environment, education and health, legal issues in media, communication for development, research methods, and training of trainers.  I'm currently leading a UNICEF project to assess the capacity of universities in Bangladesh to offer courses and conduct research in communication for development.  In June 2016, I conducted a two-week course on communication for development for junior faculty and doctoral research scholars from Indian universities at Tezpur University in Assam under a program funded by the government of India. In 2015, I led a two-week training-of-trainers course for broadcast managers, engineers and programmers from ASEAN countries in Kuala Lumpur. 

 

TRAINING/CONSULTING

I regularly conduct workshops for journalists, broadcasters, development professionals, university faculty and students in Asia and Africa.  My specialties are reporting on human development issues, including the environment, education and health, legal issues in media, communication for development, research methods, and training of trainers. 

I'm currently leading a UNICEF project to assess the capacity of universities in Bangladesh to offer courses and conduct research in communication for development.  In June 2016, I conducted a two-week course on communication for development for junior faculty and doctoral research scholars from Indian universities at Tezpur University in Assam under a program funded by the government of India. In 2015, I led a two-week training-of-trainers course for broadcast managers, engineers and programmers from ASEAN countries in Kuala Lumpur. 

  UNICEF C4D COURSE Since 2011, I’ve headed a multinational team offering a six-month blended learning course for UNICEF staff.  The course focuses on how to use communication in health, education, nutrition, water and sanitation, child protection, and other areas. Almost 400 UNICEF staff members from over 60 countries have completed the course.  From 2013 to 2015, we partnered with the School of Public Health at the University of Witwatersrand in Johannesburg to hold the two-week workshop; in 2016, our partner was the Department of Communication at the University of Hyderabad in India.

 

UNICEF C4D COURSE

Since 2011, I’ve headed a multinational team offering a six-month blended learning course for UNICEF staff.  The course focuses on how to use communication in health, education, nutrition, water and sanitation, child protection, and other areas. Almost 400 UNICEF staff members from over 60 countries have completed the course.  From 2013 to 2015, we partnered with the School of Public Health at the University of Witwatersrand in Johannesburg to hold the two-week workshop; in 2016, our partner was the Department of Communication at the University of Hyderabad in India.

  american newsfilm To mark the 100th anniversary of the outbreak of World War I, Routledge republished my 1984 book American Newsfilm 1914–1919: The Underexposed War.  It features the story of the self-styled “photographer-adventurer” Donald Thompson, who shot newsreels, feature-length films and stills in France, Belgium, the Balkans and Russia.  I've also contributed research and photos to Helen Rappaport's new book Caught in the Revolution: Petrograd 1917, which documents the experiences of expatriates including Thompson. I recently finished editing and annotating Thompson's letters describing his experiences in 1917, Donald Thompson in Russia. It will be published by Slavica Press (Indiana University) in its new series, Americans in Revolutionary Russia.  In March 2017, in a series at the University of Kansas to mark the 100th anniversary of World War I, I gave a public lecture, "Images of World War One: The Films of Pioneer Kansas Photographer Donald Thompson."

 

american newsfilm

To mark the 100th anniversary of the outbreak of World War I, Routledge republished my 1984 book American Newsfilm 19141919: The Underexposed War.  It features the story of the self-styled “photographer-adventurer” Donald Thompson, who shot newsreels, feature-length films and stills in France, Belgium, the Balkans and Russia.  I've also contributed research and photos to Helen Rappaport's new book Caught in the Revolution: Petrograd 1917, which documents the experiences of expatriates including Thompson. I recently finished editing and annotating Thompson's letters describing his experiences in 1917, Donald Thompson in Russia. It will be published by Slavica Press (Indiana University) in its new series, Americans in Revolutionary Russia.  In March 2017, in a series at the University of Kansas to mark the 100th anniversary of World War I, I gave a public lecture, "Images of World War One: The Films of Pioneer Kansas Photographer Donald Thompson."


RECENT 

GLOBAL JOURNALISM PRACTICE AND NEW MEDIA PERFORMANCE

An academic volume, co-edited with Yusuf Kalyango, Director of Ohio University’s Institute for International Journalism, was published by Palgrave/Macmillan in December 2014. The contributors examine media systems in 16 countries, including China, Russia and the US. 

"[H]ow traditional journalism is practiced in a new media environment where both separately or jointly perform their due function has become an intriguing issue in recent years. This is a vital issue in countries, such as Armenia, El Salvador, Guyana, Kyrgyzstan, Suriname, and Yemen, which are not conventionally or frequently seen in our field's literature." Gang Han, Journalism & Mass Communication Educator.

"Global Journalism Practice ... demonstrates that global journalism is more than just a buzzword. Instead it is about ... how journalists and journalism/media educators view journalism practice in their own countries as well as its interaction with new media technologies and socio-political and economic situations." Sara Namusoga, African Journalism Studies.

Read the back story in "Cast Adrift: Adventures in Academic Editing" in Times Higher Education.

 

  WITH THE RUSSIANS AT THE FRONT To mark the 100th anniversary of a reporting trip to Russia by Chicago Tribune editor Robert R. McCormick with photographer Donald Thompson(above right), I gave a public lecture to a large crowd at the McCormick Museum in Wheaton, Illinois, in June.  The museum had obtained a copy of the the Thompson/McCormick film With the Russians at the Front (unfortunately, only about half the original firm has survived). During my visit, I had time to go through correspondence and diaries in the McCormick archives, which yielded more information about the 1915 trip and Thompson's later exploits.    

 

WITH THE RUSSIANS AT THE FRONT

To mark the 100th anniversary of a reporting trip to Russia by Chicago Tribune editor Robert R. McCormick with photographer Donald Thompson(above right), I gave a public lecture to a large crowd at the McCormick Museum in Wheaton, Illinois, in June.  The museum had obtained a copy of the the Thompson/McCormick film With the Russians at the Front (unfortunately, only about half the original firm has survived). During my visit, I had time to go through correspondence and diaries in the McCormick archives, which yielded more information about the 1915 trip and Thompson's later exploits.